Course of Forest Conservation, Division of Biosphere Science, Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University

Forest Dynamics Research

Observation on the relationships between organisms and environments

We investigate the responses of biological interactions and communities to environmental change to clarify maintenance and change mechanisms of northern forest and wetland ecosystems. We apply a large variety of research techniques on the field (e.g. field experimental manipulations and long-term monitoring). We consider the whole experimental forest as a huge laboratory. Thus, we energetically conduct field experimental manipulations to get the direct evidence in the relationships between organisms and environments. For example, above- and under-ground parts of mature trees (20m in height) are warmed by electrically heated cables, and long-sequence fences are built to control deer density. Furthermore, we conduct geographical study for comparing forest ecosystem functions and continue for long-term observation on reproductive processes of trees and diversity of insects and fungus. Our research areas include community ecology, forest ecology, conservation ecology, mycology, and entomology.

The warming experiment of oak trees (Quercus crispula) using electrically heated cables: branch warming (left) and soil warming (right) of 20-m-high mature trees continue from 2007. We directly observe canopy leaves to measure herbivory by moth larvae, and photosynthesis and respiratory functions using canopy crane.

The warming experiment of oak trees (Quercus crispula) using electrically heated cables: branch warming (left) and soil warming (right) of 20-m-high mature trees continue from 2007. We directly observe canopy leaves to measure herbivory by moth larvae, and photosynthesis and respiratory functions using canopy crane.

Litter fall manipulation to clarify the effect on the diversity of soil invertebrates

Litter fall manipulation to clarify the effect on the diversity of soil invertebrates.

Canopy access systems in deciduous (left) and evergreen forests (right) to investigate the functioning and biodiversity in forest canopies

Canopy access systems in deciduous (left) and evergreen forests (right) to investigate the functioning and biodiversity in forest canopies.

Staff