Course of Forest Conservation, Division of Biosphere Science, Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University

Faculty member

<Forest Environment and Function Research>

SATOH Fuyuki / Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
SATOH Fuyuki
[Research Topic]

 

[Keywords]

・Forest Environment Functions・Forest Soil・Hydrology・Material Cycling・Forest Rehabilitation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

f-satoh*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

My research interests cover the dynamics of water, nutrients and chemical materials in forest soil and watershed under the impact of forest managements, wild fire, acid deposition and other anthropogenic activities. The goal of my study directs to the development of forest management techniques for conservation of forest environment functions. The major research approaches are field monitoring and chemical analysis including the watershed-scale experimental manipulation in experimental forests, recently involving the forest sites in China, Russia and Scandinavia.

[publications]

(1)Kobayashi, M., Shibata, H., Kim, YS., Satomura, T., Takagi, K., Nomura, M., Satoh, F., and Koike, T. (2012) Contribution of charcoal to short-term nutrient dynamics after surface fire in the humus layer of a dwarf bamboo-dominated forest. Biology and Fertility of Soils. DOI: 10.1007/s00374-011-0657-y

(2)Kayama, M., Satoh, F., Koike, T., (2011) Photosynthetic rate, needle longevity, and nutrient contents in Picea glehnii growing on strongly acidic volcanic ash soil in northern Japan. Photosynthetica 49:239-245.

(3)Kayama, M., Makoto, K., Nomura, M., Satoh, F., Koike, T. (2009) Nutrient dynamics and carbon partitioning in larch seedlings (Larix kaempferi) regenerated on serpentine soil in northern Japan. Landscape and Ecological Engineering 5:125-135, DOI: 10.1007/s11355-009-0069-4

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SHIBATA Hideaki / Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
SHIBATA Hideaki
[Research Topic]

Biogeochemistry and environmental functions of forest ecosystem

[Keywords]

・Biogeochemistry・Soil・Stream water quality・Ecosystem ecology

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

shiba*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

My interests involve, “What’s the environmental functions of forest ecosystem”, “What’s the process and mechanism of soil and water quality?” and “How does human activities impact on the biogeochemical cycles in forest ecosystem?” Major research approaches include field sampling, monitoring and chemical analysis of soil, plant, litter and water in forest ecosystem. The recent interest is expanding to focus on the coupled human and natural system for sustainable future.

[publications]

(1)Shibata H, Urakawa R, Toda H, Inagaki Y, Tateno R, Koba K, Nakanishi A, Fukuzawa K, Yamasaki A (2011) Changes in nitrogen transformation in forest soil representing the climate gradient of the Japanese archipelago. Journal of Forest Research 16(5): 374-385 

(2)Shibata H, Toda T, Inagaki Y, Tateno R, Koba K, Tange T (2011) Editorial; Soil nitrogen dynamics of forest ecosystems under environmental changes. Journal of Forest Research 16(5): 331-332 

(3)Park J-H, Duan L, Kim B, Mitchell MJ, Shibata H (2010) Potential Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Watershed Biogeochemical Processes and Water Quality in Northeast Asia. Environment International 36: 212-225. 

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TAKAGI Kentaro /
Associate Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
TAKAGI Kentaro
[Research Topic]

Forest carbon cycle

[Keywords]

・Forest micrometeorology・Ecosystem ecology・Carbon cycle・Climate change・Disturbance

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kentt*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

Research topics: Effect of forestry activities on carbon & water cycles; Effect of global warming on soil respiration; Inter-site comparison of carbon cycles of Asian forests; Regional scale evaluation of forest carbon cycle

[publications]

(1)Takagi, K., et al. (2009) Change in CO2 balance under a series of forestry activities in a cool-temperate mixed forest with dense undergrowth. Global Change Biology, 15, 1275-1288. 

(2)Takagi, K., et al. (2005) Dynamic carbon dioxide exchange through snowpack by wind-driven mass transfer in a conifer-broadleaf mixed forest in northernmost Japan. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 19, GB2012, doi: 10.1029/2004GB002272 

(3)Takagi, K., et al. (2010) Allometric relationships and carbon and nitrogen contents for three major tree species (Quercus crispula, Betula ermanii, and Abies sachalinensis) in northern Hokkaido, Japan. Eurasian Journal of Forest Research, 13, 1-7. 

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NOMURA Mutsumi /
Assistant Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
NOMURA Mutsumi
[Research Topic]

Hydrological processes in snowy forests

[Keywords]

・Forest hydrology・Snow hydrology・River discharge・Snowmelt・Water budget

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

nomu*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

Research topics: Snow accumulation and melting processes in forests of northern Hokkaido; Water budgets and hydrological processes in forest catchments

[publications]

(1)Nomura, M., Satoh, F., Ashiya, D. and Masumoto, H. (1999) Observation and simulation of snowcover in a mountain region (in Japanese). Research Bulletin of the Hokkkaido University Forests, 56: 11-19 

(2)Nomura, M., Sasa, K., Satoh, F., Shibata, H., Uemura, S., Fujiwara, K. and Chekurdaev, G.A. (2002) Snowmelt Runoff at a Seasonal Ground Frost Basin in Southern Sakhalin, Russia. Eurasian Journal of Forest Research, 5: 11-21 

(3)Takagi, K., Nomura, M., Ashiya, D., Takahashi, H., Sasa, K., Fujinuma, Y., Shibata, H., Akibayashi, Y. and Koike, T. (2005) Dynamic carbon dioxide exchange through snowpack by wind-driven mass transfer in a conifer-broadleaf mixed forest in northernmost Japan. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 19, GB2012, doi: 10.1029/2004GB002272 

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FUKUZAWA Karibu /
Assistant Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
FUKUZAWA Karibu
[Research Topic]

Carbon and nutrient dynamics in rhizosphere and ecosystem function of forest

[Keywords]

・ecosystem function・biogeochemistry・root dynamics and function・Sasa dwarf bamboo・forest management

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

caribu*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

I evaluate environmental function of forests by determining carbon and nutrient cycling from fieldwork and chemical analysis. I am interested in the role of root and clarified that net primary production of fine root, which is the interface of plant and soil, corresponds to litterfall. Shall we determine forest function by ourselves?

[publications]

(1)Fukuzawa K., Dannoura M., Kanemitsu S.., Kosugi Y. (2010) Seasonal patterns of root production of Japanese oak seedlings and dwarf bamboo grown in the rhizoboxes. Plant Biosystems 144:434-439 

(2)Fukuzawa, K., Dannoura, M., and Shibata, H. (2012) Fine root dynamics and root respiration, "Measuring roots: An updated approach, Mancuso, S. Eds.", Springer, ISBN 978-3-642-22066-1, pp. 291-302, Heidelberg

(3)Shibata H, Fukuzawa K (2010) Characteristics of Nitrogen Cycling in Natural Forest Ecosystem of Northern Hokkaido, Japan. Enviromental Science 23:277-283 (Japanese with English summary) 

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<Forest Dynamics Research>

HIURA Tsutom / Professor

Forest Dynamics Research
HIURA Tsutom
[Research Topic]

Emergence mechanisms and the role on ecosystem functions of species diversity in forest ecosystems

[Keywords]

・Biological interaction・Geographic variation・Disturbance・Productivity・Forest dynamics

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

hiura*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

The entire Japanese archipelago has a major environmental gradients, forest has formed peculiar ecosystems by interact each other. How do trait variations in trees relate to the biodiversity and the ecosystem functions? I am trying to clear the relationships by approaching the forest canopy and the underground.

[publications]

(1)Hiura, T. (1995) Gap formation and species diversity in Japanese beech forests: a test of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis on a geographic scale. Oecologia 104: 265-271.

(2)Hiura, T. and Fujiwara, K. (1999) Density-dependence and coexistence of conifer and broad-leaved trees in a northern mixed forest. Journal of Vegetation Science 10: 843-850.

(3)Hiura, T. (2005) Aboveground biomass and net biomass increment in a cool temperate forest on a landscape scale. Ecological Research 20: 271-277.

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UEMURA Shigeru / Associate Professor

Forest Dynamics Research
UEMURA Shigeru
[Research Topic]

Ecological study for reproduction and resource-use traits in forest plants

[Keywords]

・reproductive strategies・vegetation structure・life form・resource-use・phenology

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

umr*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

How and why diverse life history and reproductive habits in forest plants have been evolved? Why does the Asian skunk cabbage Symplocarpus renifoius generate heat at the spadix? Field observation will lead us to know such interesting adaptive traits developed through interaction with circumstances, e.g. vegetation structure, pollen/seed vectors or herbivores.

[publications]

(1)Uemura, S. and Sugiura, Y. (2007) Density-dependent hoarding by rodents contributes to large variation in seed mass of the woodland herb Symplocarpus renifolius. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 37: 1675-1680. 

(2)Uemura, S., Takada, E. and Nakamura, T. (2010) The architecture and nutrient-use traits of dwarf Alnus japonica in the Kushiro Mire, northern Japan. Vegetation Science 27: 11-20. (in Japanese with English summary)

(3)Uemura, S. (2005) Life history and function in herbaceous forest understory. In: Science of Forest (eds. Nakamura, F. and Koike, T.), 40-41. Asakura, Tokyo. (in Japanese) 

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CHA Jooyoung / Associate Professor

Forest Dynamics Research
CHA Jooyoung
[Research Topic]

Fungal networks in forest ecosystem

[Keywords]

・Fungal networks・Mycorrhizal fungi・Decomposing fungi・Mushroom cultivations・Coastal forests

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

jycha*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

The largest and oldest organism that is alive on earth is Armillaria. How is it possible? It is possible due to the relationship forming networks that Armillaria and other living creatures like plants and other fungi as parasite, decomposer and symbiont. The investigation of fungal networks in forest ecosystem is the most interesting subject in my research.

[publications]

(1)J. Y. Cha, J. M. Sung and T. Igarashi: Biological species and morphological characteristics of Armillaria mellea complex in Hokkaido (1994) A. sinapina and two new species, A. jezoensis and A. singular. Mycoscience, 35: 39-47 

(2)Joo Young Cha, Kun Woo Chun, Sang Yong Lee, Si Young Lee and Shoji Ohga (2009) Detection of Tricholoma matsutake in soil after forest fire in a Pinus densiflora forest in Korea. Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture Kyushu University, 54 (2): 261-265 

(3)J.Y. Cha, S. Y. Lee, S. Y. Lee and K. W. Chun (2011) Basidiocarp formation by Innotus obliquus on a living paper birch tree. Forest Pathology, 41: 163-16 

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NAKAMURA Masahiro / Associate professor

Forest Dynamics Research
NAKAMURA Masahiro
[Research Topic]

herbivore-plant interactions, responses to global warming, biodiversity and ecosystem function

[Keywords]

・community ecology・global warming・biological interactions・filed manipulations・biodiversity

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

masahiro*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

Herbivore insects are the largest group of terrestrial animals on earth. To understand how herbivore insects respond to environmental changes, I conduct warming experiments of oak and birch mature trees (20m in height) using electric heating cables with collaborators. Moreover, I am very interested in the effects of species richness of trees (biodiversity) on variability in forest disturbance from herbivory (ecosystem function).

[publications]

(1)Nakamura, M., Muller, O., Tayanagi, S., Nakaji, T., Hiura, T. (2010) Experimental branch warming alters tall tree leaf phenology and acorn production. Agricultural and Forest Meteology 150: 1026-1029 

(2)Nakamura, M., Asanuma, M., Hiura, T. (2010) Differential effects of host plant hybridization on herbivore community structure and grazing pressure on forest canopies. Oikos 119: 1445-1452 

(3)Nakamura M., Miyamoto, Y., Ohgushi, T. (2003) Gall formation enhances the availability of food resources for herbivorous insects. Functional Ecology 17: 851-857 

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<Conservation Biology Research>

SAITOH Takashi / Professor

Conservation Biology Research
SAITOH Takashi
[Research Topic]

Population dynamics and spatial genetic structure in wildlife

[Keywords]

・Mammal・Population ecology・Life history・DNA・Animal conservation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

tsaitoh*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

How and why do animal populations fluctuate? How are populations structured? What ecological functions does the structure have? These are main questions that we are struggling to answer by investigating wild populations of rodents and deer. We are considering conservation problems through answering the above ecological questions.

[publications]

(1)Saitoh T, Vik JO, Stenseth NC, Takanishi T, Hayakashi S, Ishida N, Ohmori M, Morita T, Uemura S, Kadomatsu M, Osawa J, Maekawa K (2008) Effects of acorn abundance on density dependence in a Japanese wood mouse (Apodemus speciosus) population. Population Ecology 50(2): 159-167 

(2)Stenseth, N. C., Viljugrein, H., Saitoh, T., Hansen, T. F., Kittilsen, M. O., Bølviken, E. and Glöckner, F. (2003) Seasonality, density dependence and population cycles in Hokkaido voles. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 100: 11478-11483 

(3)Terada C, Tatsuzawa S, Saitoh T (2012) Ecological correlates and determinants in the geographical variation of deer morphology. Oecologia, online: DOI 10.1007/s00442-012-2270-7 

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KADOMATSU Masahiko / Associate Professor

Conservation Biology Research
KADOMATSU Masahiko
[Research Topic]

Clarification of ecological and genetic variation in northern forest, and the conservation

[Keywords]

・genetic diversity・provenance test・ecological genetics・genetic resource・conservation of populations

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kado*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

The species of trees have survived as a result of keeping the genetic diversity. The environment of habitat selects the adaptable individuals of the same species, and then the regional populations are genetically different. My research interests are the genetic variation in trees and the conservation of the genetic resources.

[publications]

(1)Kadomatsu, M (1997) Differences in phenology of Quercus collected from northeastern China, eastern Hokkaido and western Honshu. Research Bulletin of the Hokkaido University Forests 54(2): 188-201 

(2)Kadomatsu, M, Kaneko K, Arikura K, Ichikawa K, Cha J. Y (2001) Differences in the severity of needle yellowing and dieback among the Picea glehnii families in the provenance test site. Journal of the Japanese Forest Society 83(4): 347-350 

(3)Kadomatsu, M (2008) Quercus crispula, Q. dentata. “Forest tree breeding and genetic resource in Hokkaido”, Hokkaido Forest Tree Breeding Association, pp. 161-178,Ebetsu

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AGETSUMA Naoki / Associate Professor

Conservation Biology Research
AGETSUMA Naoki
[Research Topic]

Responses of mammals to natural and artificial disturbances

[Keywords]

・mammal・behavior・disturbance・habitat・adaptation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

agetsuma*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Wildlife species receive various natural fluctuations and artificial impacts. How does wildlife adapt their ecologies to these disturbances? From this point of view, I am studying adaptations of mammal species to these disturbances. I am also studying the interaction between herbivores and forest ecosystem by field experiments.

[publications]

(1)Agetsuma, N. Agetsuma-Yanagihara, Y. and Takafumi, H. (2011) Food habits of Japanese deer in an evergreen forest: Litter-feeding deer. Mammalian Biology, 76: 201-207. 

(2)Agetsuma, N. (2007) Minimum area required for local populations of Japanese macaques estimated from the relationship between habitat area and population extinction. International Journal of Primatology 28: 97-106. 

(3)Agetsuma, N. (2007) Ecological function losses caused by monotonous land use induce crop raiding by wildlife on the island of Yakushima, southern Japan. Ecological Research 22: 390-402. 

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UTSUMI Shunsuke / Associate Professor

Conservation Biology Research
Shunsuke UTSUMI
[Research Topic]

Plant-animal interaction, creation and maintenance of biodiversity

[Keywords]

Biodiversity, Evolutionary community ecology, Eco-evolutionary feedback, Contemporary evolution, Genetics, Symbiosis, Phenotypic plasticity, Insect Ecology

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

Website

[Message]

I am interested in the ecology and evolution of species interactions, particularly as it relates to plant-animal interactions. Our lab members enthusiastically address diverse questions to bridge genetics, evolution, and ecology in a wide range of terrestrial organisms, bacteria, plants, and animals (e.g., nitrogen-fixing symbiont, invasive herb, tree, herbivorous insects, sika deer). My main research area is evolutionary community ecology, in which I focus on the dynamic interplay between the ecology and evolution of plant-associated insect communities. We generally perform both field observation and experimental approaches in laboratory and field.

[publications]

(1)Utsumi, S., Ando, Y., Roininen, H., Takahashi, J., Ohgushi, T. (2013) Herbivore community promotes trait evolution in a leaf beetle via induced plant response. Ecology Letters 16: 362-370  

(2)Utsumi, S., Ando, Y., Craig, T.P., Ohgushi, T. (2011) Plant genotypic diversity increases population size of a herbivorous insect. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Science 278: 3108-3115  

(3)Utsumi, S. (2011) Eco-evolutionary dynamics in herbivorous insect communities mediated by induced plant responses. Population Ecology 53: 23-34 

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KISHIDA Osamu / Associate professor

Conservation Biology Research
KISHIDA Osamu
[Research Topic]

Life history, Phenotypic plasticity, Intraspecific variation

[Keywords]

・Evolutionary Ecology・Cannibalism・Community Ecology・Phenotypic plasticity・Intraspecific variation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kishida*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

My research is focused on the ecology and evolution in biological interactions, in particular the role of phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variation of animals in affecting population dynamics and shaping communities. I am also interested in adaptive strategy in life history, morphology and behavioral traits of animals. This work involves laboratory projects and field research using amphibian larvae.

[publications]

(1)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Ohno, A., Kuwano, S., Ikawa, T., Nishimura, K. (2011) Predation risk suppresses the positive feedback between size-structure and cannibalism. Journal of Animal Ecology, 80: 1278-1287 

(2)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Nishimura, K. (2009) Top-down effects on antagonistic inducible defense and offense. Ecology, 90: 1217-1226. 

(3)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Nishimura, K., Ohgushi, T. (2009) Inducible defenses in prey intensify predator cannibalism. Ecology, 90: 3150-3158. 

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<Regional Resource Management Research>

YOSHIDA Toshiya / Professor

Regional Resource Management Research
YOSHIDA Toshiya
[Research Topic]

Forestry management with considering ecosystem sustainability

[Keywords]

・uneven-aged forestry・mixed forest・natural disturbance・dead woods・ecosystem functions

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

yoto*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Utilization of wood materials, a renewable natural resource, is significant for developing ecologically sustainable society. However, forestry practices have often caused degradation of the target ecosystem. I’m conducting studies on structure, dynamics and diversity of managed forests, and am trying to establish alternative management regimes which make harmony with conservation issues.

[publications]

(1)Yoshida, T., Noguchi, M., Uemura, S., Yanaba, S., Miya, H. and Hiura, T. (2011) Tree mortality in a natural mixed forest affected by stand fragmentation and by a strong typhoon in northern Japan. Journal of Forest Research. 16: 215-222

(2)Yoshida, T. and Noguchi, M. 2009. Vulnerability to strong winds for major tree species in a northern Japanese mixed forest: analyses of historical data. Ecological Research, 24: 909-919.

(3)Yoshida, T., Noguchi, M., Akibayashi, Y., Noda, M., Kadomatsu, M. and Sasa, K. (2006) Twenty years of community dynamics in a mixed conifer-broad-leaved forest under a selection system in northern Japan. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 36: 1363-1375 

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NAKAJI Tatsuro / Assistant Professor

Regional Resource Management Research
NAKAJI Tatsuro
[Research Topic]

Optical remote sensing of tree's ecophysiological function and the response to the environmental stresses.

[Keywords]

・Climate change・Field experiment・Forest trees・Non-destructive monitoring・Scaling up

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

nakaji*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

How can we evaluate the health condition of forest? One of the powerful tools is the optical remote sensing (RS) technique. Optical RS deals mainly with the spectral feature of foliar reflectance which related to the ecophysiological characteristics such as photosynthesis and nutrient status. In my laboratory, some field experiments are conducted, and we are analyzing the relationship between the optical characteristics and tree responses to the environmental stresses such as warming. Let's study the potential and application of RS for the risk assessment of natural forest with us!

[publications]

(1)Nakaji, T., Oguma, H. and Hiura, T. (2011) Ground-based monitoring of the leaf phenology of deciduous broad-leaved trees using high resolution NDVI camera images. Journal of Agricultural Meteorology, 67: 65-74 

(2)Nakaji, T., Noguchi, K., and Oguma, H. (2008) Classification of rhizosphere components using visible-near infrared spectral images. Plant and Soil, 310: 245-261. 

(3)Nakaji, T., Ide, R., Takagi, K., Kosugi, Y., Ohkubo, S., Nishida, K., Saigusa, N. and Oguma, H. (2008) Utility of spectral vegetation indices for estimation of light conversion efficiency in managed coniferous forests in Japan. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 148: 776-787. 

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KOBAYASHI Makoto / Assistant Professor

Regional Resource Management Research
Makoto Kobayashi
[Research Topic]

Effect of climate change on plant-soil linkage in boreal forest ecosystem

[Keywords]

Tree ecophysiology・Biogeochemistry・Soil fauna・Disturbance・(Winter) climate change

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

makoto*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

“How does the climate change affect plant and soil linkage?” This is the question that keeps me awake at night! By utilizing biochemical technique, field survey and field manipulation experiment, I am clarifying the mechanisms of the effects. Recently I am especially focusing on the relationship between soil fauna and tree ecophysiological traits and on winter climate change.

[publications]

(1)Klaminder, J., Giesler, R., Makoto, K. (2013) Physical mixing between humus and mineral matter found in cryoturbated soils increases short-term heterotrophic respiration rates. Soil Biology and Biochemistry. 57: 922-924. 

(2)Makoto, K., Shibata, H., Kim, Y.S., Satomura, T., Takagi, K., Nomura, M., Satoh, F., Koike, T. (2012) Contribution of charcoal to short-term nutrient dynamics after surface fire in the humus layer of a dwarf bamboo-dominated forest. Biology and Fertility of Soils. 48: 569-577. 

(3)Makoto, K., Hirobe, M., DeLuca, T.H., Bryanin, S.V., Procopchuk, V.F., Koike, T. (2011) Effects of fire-derived charcoal on soil properties and seedling regeneration in a recently burned Larix gmelinii/Pinus sylvestris forest. Journal of Soils and Sediments. 11:1317-1322. 

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