Course in Forest Field Science, Division of Biosphere Science, Graduate School of Environmental Science, Hokkaido University

Faculty member

<Forest Environment and Function Research>

TAKAGI Kentaro /
Associate Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
TAKAGI Kentaro
[Research Topic]

Forest carbon cycle

[Keywords]

, Forest micrometeorology, Ecosystem ecology, Carbon cycle, Climate change, Disturbance

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kentt*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

Research topics: Effect of forestry activities on carbon & water cycles; Effect of global warming on soil respiration; Inter-site comparison of carbon cycles of Asian forests; Regional scale evaluation of forest carbon cycle

[publications]

(1)Takagi, K., et al. (2009) Change in CO2 balance under a series of forestry activities in a cool-temperate mixed forest with dense undergrowth. Global Change Biology, 15, 1275-1288. 

(2)Takagi, K., et al. (2005) Dynamic carbon dioxide exchange through snowpack by wind-driven mass transfer in a conifer-broadleaf mixed forest in northernmost Japan. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 19, GB2012, doi: 10.1029/2004GB002272 

(3)Takagi, K., et al. (2010) Allometric relationships and carbon and nitrogen contents for three major tree species (Quercus crispula, Betula ermanii, and Abies sachalinensis) in northern Hokkaido, Japan. Eurasian Journal of Forest Research, 13, 1-7. 

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NOMURA Mutsumi /
Assistant Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
NOMURA Mutsumi
[Research Topic]

Hydrological processes in snowy forests

[Keywords]

, Forest hydrology, Snow hydrology, River discharge, Snowmelt, Water budget

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

nomu*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

Research topics: Snow accumulation and melting processes in forests of northern Hokkaido; Water budgets and hydrological processes in forest catchments

[publications]

(1)Nomura, M., Satoh, F., Ashiya, D. and Masumoto, H. (1999) Observation and simulation of snowcover in a mountain region (in Japanese). Research Bulletin of the Hokkkaido University Forests, 56: 11-19 

(2)Nomura, M., Sasa, K., Satoh, F., Shibata, H., Uemura, S., Fujiwara, K. and Chekurdaev, G.A. (2002) Snowmelt Runoff at a Seasonal Ground Frost Basin in Southern Sakhalin, Russia. Eurasian Journal of Forest Research, 5: 11-21 

(3)Takagi, K., Nomura, M., Ashiya, D., Takahashi, H., Sasa, K., Fujinuma, Y., Shibata, H., Akibayashi, Y. and Koike, T. (2005) Dynamic carbon dioxide exchange through snowpack by wind-driven mass transfer in a conifer-broadleaf mixed forest in northernmost Japan. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 19, GB2012, doi: 10.1029/2004GB002272 

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OHIRA Mitsuru / Assistant Professor

Forest Environment and Function Research
Mitsuru OHIRA
[Research Topic]

Contribution of forest to stream ecosystem

[Keywords]

forest disturbance, succession, aquatic insect, fish, watershed management

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

mohira*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

“How does forest contribute to stream environments and assemblages?” is my fundamental research question. I examine responses of stream assemblages to forest disturbance, succession, and management with evaluating changes of forest conditions and functions. I also explore the contributions of forest to downstream and the related watershed-scale management.

[publications]

(1) Ohira M, Watanabe Y, Gomi T, Sakai M (2021) Long-term impacts of forest disturbances: Comparing cumulative effects of clearcut logging versus landslide on stream conditions and abundance of a headwater stonefly Scopura montana. Freshwater Biology, 00, 1–12 DOI:10.1111/fwb.13811

(2) Ohira M, Gomi T, Iwai A, Hiraoka M, Uchiyama Y (2022) Ecological resilience of physical plant–soil feedback to chronic deer herbivory: Slow, partial, but functional recovery. Ecological Applications, e2656. DOI:10.1002/eap.2656

(3) Ohira M, Fukuda S (2018) Flow regime shapes seasonal patterns of fish species richness and abundance in main and branch channels of a rice irrigation system. Paddy and Water Environment, 16, 783–793. DOI:10.1007/s10333-018-0669-4

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<Biodiversity Research>

AGETSUMA Naoki / Professor

Biodiversity Research
AGETSUMA Naoki
[Research Topic]

Responses of mammals to natural and artificial disturbances

[Keywords]

, mammal, behavior, disturbance, habitat, adaptation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

agetsuma*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Wildlife species receive various natural fluctuations and artificial impacts. How does wildlife adapt their ecologies to these disturbances? From this point of view, I am studying adaptations of mammal species to these disturbances. I am also studying the interaction between herbivores and forest ecosystem by field experiments.

I basically accept students who have concrete research themes and plans that are suitable for my supervising. If you wish to receive my instructions in our postgraduate course, send me your research plans firstly. My students must work in the facility of our University Forests which locates the rural city far from Sapporo main campus of Hokkaido University.

[publications]

(1) Agetsuma N (2018) A simple method for calculating minimum estimates of previous population sizes of wildlife from hunting records. PLOS ONE 13(6): e0198794. 

(2) Agetsuma N, Koda R, Tsujino R, Agetsuma-Yanagihara Y (2016) Impact of anthropogenic disturbance on the density and activity pattern of deer evaluated with respect to spatial scale-dependency. Mammalian Biology 81: 130-137. 

(3) Agetsuma N, Koda R, Tsujino R, Agetsuma-Yanagihara Y (2015) Effective spatial scales for evaluating environmental determinants of population density in Yakushima macaques. American Journal of Primatology 77: 152-161. 

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NAKAMURA Masahiro / Professor

Biodiversity Research
NAKAMURA Masahiro
[Research Topic]

herbivore-plant interactions, responses to global warming, biodiversity and ecosystem function

[Keywords]

, community ecology, global warming, biological interactions, filed manipulations, biodiversity

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

masahiro*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Herbivore insects are the largest group of terrestrial animals on earth. To understand how herbivore insects respond to environmental changes, I conduct warming experiments of oak and birch mature trees (20m in height) using electric heating cables with collaborators. Moreover, I am very interested in the effects of species richness of trees (biodiversity) on variability in forest disturbance from herbivory (ecosystem function).

[publications]

(1)Nakamura, M., Muller, O., Tayanagi, S., Nakaji, T., Hiura, T. (2010) Experimental branch warming alters tall tree leaf phenology and acorn production. Agricultural and Forest Meteology 150: 1026-1029 

(2)Nakamura, M., Asanuma, M., Hiura, T. (2010) Differential effects of host plant hybridization on herbivore community structure and grazing pressure on forest canopies. Oikos 119: 1445-1452 

(3)Nakamura M., Miyamoto, Y., Ohgushi, T. (2003) Gall formation enhances the availability of food resources for herbivorous insects. Functional Ecology 17: 851-857 

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KISHIDA Osamu / Associate professor

Biodiversity Research
KISHIDA Osamu
[Research Topic]

Life history, Phenotypic plasticity, Intraspecific variation

[Keywords]

, Evolutionary Ecology, Cannibalism, Community Ecology, Phenotypic plasticity, Intraspecific variation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kishida*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

My research is focused on the ecology and evolution in biological interactions, in particular the role of phenotypic plasticity and intraspecific variation of animals in affecting population dynamics and shaping communities. I am also interested in adaptive strategy in life history, morphology and behavioral traits of animals. This work involves laboratory projects and field research using amphibian larvae.

[publications]

(1)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Ohno, A., Kuwano, S., Ikawa, T., Nishimura, K. (2011) Predation risk suppresses the positive feedback between size-structure and cannibalism. Journal of Animal Ecology, 80: 1278-1287 

(2)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Nishimura, K. (2009) Top-down effects on antagonistic inducible defense and offense. Ecology, 90: 1217-1226. 

(3)Kishida, O., Trussell, G.C., Nishimura, K., Ohgushi, T. (2009) Inducible defenses in prey intensify predator cannibalism. Ecology, 90: 3150-3158. 

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UETAKE Jun / Associate Professor

Biodiversity Research
UETAKE Jun
[Research Topic]

Environmental change and microbial ecosystem

[Keywords]

Microbial ecology, environmental DNA, earth science, environmental change, bioaerosol, glacier, ice nucleation

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

jun.uetake*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Invisible microbial life exists in our surrounding environment, such as soil and water, and that is also in harsh environments such as air, snow, and ice. Both outdoor fieldwork and indoor lab work( DNA and chemical analysis) enable them to reveal their community structure, community relationship, and ecology relating to the material cycles. Moreover, the microbial ecosystem is sometimes powerful enough to change the global environment, for example, 1: Ice Nucleating organisms, which can promote the ice formation to change the radiation balance in the cloud, and 2: Glacier melt enhancing organisms, which accelerate the glacier ice melting by reducing radiation reflectance due to their pigments in the cells. Therefore, we are collaborating with scientists for earth science and climatologyto tackle the global-scale subject.

[publications]

(1)J. Uetake, T. C. J. Hill, K. A. Moore, P. J. DeMott, A. Protat, S. M. Kreidenweis, 2020, Airborne bacteria confirm the pristine nature of the Southern Ocean boundary layer, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 17 (24) 13275-13282; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2000134117  

(2) J. Uetake, Y. Tobo, Y. Uji, T. C. J. Hill, P. J. DeMott, S. M. Kreidenweis, R. Misumi, Seasonal changes of airborne bacterial communities over Tokyo and influence of local meteorology, 2019, Frontiers in Microbiology, 10, Article 1572, doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01572  

(3) J. Uetake, N. Nagatsuka, Y. Onuma, N. Takeuchi, H. Motoyama, T. Aoki, Bacterial community changes with cryoconite granule size and their susceptibility to exogenous nutrients on 10 glaciers in northwestern Greenland. 2019, FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 95; 7, fiz075  

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KURATA Seikan / Assistant Professor

Biodiversity Research
Seikan KURATA
[Research Topic]

Plant taxonomy, Phylogeography, Conservation genetics

[Keywords]

Plant taxonomy, Historical range dynamics, Biodiversity and Conservation, Forests, Semi-natural grasslands

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kurata.seikan*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Climate changes influence the geographic ranges of many living organisms. In addition, recent drastic climate changes due to human disturbances increase the risk of extinction for many living organisms. My research field includes plant taxonomy, phylogeography, and conservation genetics. By using genetic and morphological information, we can discuss and elucidate natural history patterns, phylogenetic relationships,and extinction risk of plant species.

[publications]

(1) Kurata S., Sakaguchi S., Ikeda H., Hirota K. S., Kurashima O., Suyama Y., and Ito M. (2022) From East Asia to Beringia: reconstructed range dynamics of Geranium erianthum (Geraniaceae) during the last glacial period in the northern Pacific region, Plant Systematics and Evolution, 308(28), DOI: 10.1007/s00606-022-01820-4

(2) Kurata S., Vasques T. D., Sakaguchi S., Hirota K. S., Kurashima O., Suyama Y., Nishida S., and Ito M. (2021) Phylogenetic and taxonomic study of Japanese Geranium L. (Geraniaceae) using the chloroplast genome sequence and nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms, Plant Systematics and Evolution, 307(63), DOI: 10.1007/s00606-021-01788-7

(3) Kurata S., Sakaguchi S., and Ito M. (2019) Genetic diversity and population demography of Geranium soboliferum Kom var. kiusianum: A glacial relict plant in the wetlands of Japan, Conservation Genetics 20(3), 431-445. DOI: 10.1007/s10592-018-01141-5

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KASADA Minoru / Assistant Professor

Biodiversity Research
Minoru Kasada
[Research Topic]

Dynamic changes of biological interactions and their consequences in ecological systems, Co-prosperity of human and other species, Ecological data analysis

[Keywords]

Community ecology, Population dynamics, Evolution, Biodiversity

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

kasada*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[メッセージ]

Interactions between biological organisms are changing with time and circumstances. I study how these changes relate to the number and diversity of living organisms. I also consider how we humans can coexist and co-prosper with other living organisms within the limited resources available to us.

[publications]

(1) 3. M. Kasada, Y. Nakashima, K. Fukasawa, G. Yakima, H. Yokomizo, T. Miyashita. (2023) State-space model combining local camera data and regional administration data reveals population dynamics of wild boar., Population Ecology, 65(1), 80-92., DOI: 10.1002/1438-390X.12138

(2) M. Kasada, M. Matsuba, T. Miyashita. (2017) Human interest meets biodiversity hotspots: A new systematic approach for urban ecosystem conservation., PLoS One, 12(2): e0172670., DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0172670

(3) M. Kasada, M. Yamamichi, T. Yoshida. (2014) Form of an evolutionary tradeoff affects eco-evolutionary dynamics in a predator-prey system., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(45): 16035-16040., DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1406357111

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<Regional Resource Management Research>

YOSHIDA Toshiya /
Professor

Regional Resource Management Research
YOSHIDA Toshiya
[Research Topic]

Forestry management with considering ecosystem sustainability

[Keywords]

, uneven-aged forestry, mixed forest, natural disturbance, dead woods, ecosystem functions

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

yoto*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

Utilization of wood materials, a renewable natural resource, is significant for developing ecologically sustainable society. However, forestry practices have often caused degradation of the target ecosystem. I’m conducting studies on structure, dynamics and diversity of managed forests, and am trying to establish alternative management regimes which make harmony with conservation issues.

[publications]

(1)Yoshida, T., Naito, S., Nagumo, M., Hyodo, N., Inoue, T., Umegane, H., Yamazaki, H., Miya, H. and Nakamura, F.(2017) Structural complexity and ecosystem functions in a natural mixed forest under a single-tree selection silviculture. Sustainability,9: 2093; doi:10.3390/su9112093 

(2)Asada, I., Yamazaki, H. and Yoshida, T.(2017) Spatial patterns of oak (Quercus crispula) regeneration on scarification site around a conspecific overstory tree. Forest Ecology and Management, 393: 81-88 

(3)Yoshida, T., Noguchi, M., Uemura, S., Yanaba, S., Miya, H. and Hiura, T. (2011) Tree mortality in a natural mixed forest affected by stand fragmentation and by a strong typhoon in northern Japan. Journal of Forest Research. 16: 215-222

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NAKAJI Tatsuro /
Associate professor

Regional Resource Management Research
NAKAJI Tatsuro
[Research Topic]

Optical remote sensing of tree's ecophysiological function and the response to the environmental stresses.

[Keywords]

, Climate change, Field experiment, Forest trees, Non-destructive monitoring, Scaling up

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

nakaji*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

How can we evaluate the health condition of forest? One of the powerful tools is the optical remote sensing (RS) technique. Optical RS deals mainly with the spectral feature of foliar reflectance which related to the ecophysiological characteristics such as photosynthesis and nutrient status. In my laboratory, some field experiments are conducted, and we are analyzing the relationship between the optical characteristics and tree responses to the environmental stresses such as warming. Let's study the potential and application of RS for the risk assessment of natural forest with us!

[publications]

(1)Nakaji, T., Oguma, H. and Hiura, T. (2011) Ground-based monitoring of the leaf phenology of deciduous broad-leaved trees using high resolution NDVI camera images. Journal of Agricultural Meteorology, 67: 65-74 

(2)Nakaji, T., Noguchi, K., and Oguma, H. (2008) Classification of rhizosphere components using visible-near infrared spectral images. Plant and Soil, 310: 245-261. 

(3)Nakaji, T., Ide, R., Takagi, K., Kosugi, Y., Ohkubo, S., Nishida, K., Saigusa, N. and Oguma, H. (2008) Utility of spectral vegetation indices for estimation of light conversion efficiency in managed coniferous forests in Japan. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 148: 776-787. 

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FUKUZAWA Karibu /
Associate professor

Regional Resource Management Research
FUKUZAWA Karibu
[Research Topic]

Carbon and nutrient dynamics in rhizosphere and ecosystem function of forest

[Keywords]

, ecosystem function, biogeochemistry, root dynamics and function, Sasa dwarf bamboo, forest management

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

caribu*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

I evaluate environmental function of forests by determining carbon and nutrient cycling from fieldwork and chemical analysis. I am interested in the role of root and clarified that net primary production of fine root, which is the interface of plant and soil, corresponds to litterfall. Shall we determine forest function by ourselves?

[publications]

(1)Fukuzawa K., Dannoura M., Kanemitsu S.., Kosugi Y. (2010) Seasonal patterns of root production of Japanese oak seedlings and dwarf bamboo grown in the rhizoboxes. Plant Biosystems 144:434-439 

(2)Fukuzawa, K., Dannoura, M., and Shibata, H. (2012) Fine root dynamics and root respiration, "Measuring roots: An updated approach, Mancuso, S. Eds.", Springer, ISBN 978-3-642-22066-1, pp. 291-302, Heidelberg

(3)Shibata H, Fukuzawa K (2010) Characteristics of Nitrogen Cycling in Natural Forest Ecosystem of Northern Hokkaido, Japan. Enviromental Science 23:277-283 (Japanese with English summary) 

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KOBAYASHI Makoto /
Associate professor

Regional Resource Management Research
Makoto Kobayashi
[Research Topic]

Effect of climate change on plant and soil system in northern ecosystem

[Keywords]

Tree ecophysiology, Biogeochemistry, Soil fauna, Disturbance, (Winter) climate change

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

makoto*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

Website

[Message]

“How does the climate change affect plant and soil linkage?” This is the question that keeps me awake at night! By utilizing biochemical technique, field survey and field manipulation experiment, I am clarifying the mechanisms of the effects. Recently I am especially focusing on the relationship between soil fauna and tree ecophysiological traits and on winter climate change.

[publications]

(1) Makoto, K., Minamiya, Y., Kaneko, N. (2016) Differences in soil type drive the intraspecific variation in the responses of an earthworm species and, consequently, tree growth to warming. Plant and Soil. 404: 209-218. 

(2) Makoto, K., Hirobe, M., DeLuca, T.H., Bryanin, S.V., Procopchuk,V.F., Koike, T. (2011) Effects of fire-derived charcoal on soil properties and seedling regeneration in a recently burned Larix gmelinii/Pinussylvestris forest. Journal of Soils and Sediments. 11:1317-1322. 

(3) Makoto, K., Kajimoto, T., Koyama, L., Kudo, G., Shibata, H., Yanai, Y., Cornelissen, J.H.C. (2014) Winter climate change in plant-soil system: summary of recent findings and future perspective. Ecological Research. DOI: 10.1007/s11284-013-1115-0 

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CHA Jooyoung /
Associate Professor

Regional Resource Management Research
CHA Jooyoung
[Research Topic]

Fungal networks in forest ecosystem

[Keywords]

, Fungal networks, Mycorrhizal fungi, Decomposing fungi, Mushroom cultivations, Coastal forests

[Contact] (Replace "*" with "@" when sending email.)

jycha*fsc.hokudai.ac.jp

[Message]

The largest and oldest organism that is alive on earth is Armillaria. How is it possible? It is possible due to the relationship forming networks that Armillaria and other living creatures like plants and other fungi as parasite, decomposer and symbiont. The investigation of fungal networks in forest ecosystem is the most interesting subject in my research.

[publications]

(1)J. Y. Cha, J. M. Sung and T. Igarashi: Biological species and morphological characteristics of Armillaria mellea complex in Hokkaido (1994) A. sinapina and two new species, A. jezoensis and A. singular. Mycoscience, 35: 39-47 

(2)Joo Young Cha, Kun Woo Chun, Sang Yong Lee, Si Young Lee and Shoji Ohga (2009) Detection of Tricholoma matsutake in soil after forest fire in a Pinus densiflora forest in Korea. Journal of the Faculty of Agriculture Kyushu University, 54 (2): 261-265 

(3)J.Y. Cha, S. Y. Lee, S. Y. Lee and K. W. Chun (2011) Basidiocarp formation by Innotus obliquus on a living paper birch tree. Forest Pathology, 41: 163-16 

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